I'm gonna melt you guys!

#135303 by AccEvolution
Thu Dec 07, 2006 10:43 pm
"Warning: This album will pound your ass like Ron Jeremy."

I really, really want this album.

#135337 by Biert
Fri Dec 08, 2006 9:36 am
Edkaye wrote:
danceswithchickens wrote:Lots of myths and misinformation out there...there's also supposed to be a certain frequency that can get girls off without physical contact...could give a whole new meaning to The Hummer...


Yeah, it is a $100 note. Zing! :D

God Damn, that cracked me up! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


I believe "The Hummer" is also the way to describe the act of performing oral sex, while making a humming sound, thus bringing extra stimulation for the receiver (was that politely put or what? :P )

#135343 by gozu
Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:17 am
i fell over at a sunn0))) gig, the frequency/volume just off set my balance and i went *whumph*

#135346 by Biert
Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:39 am
I've been told Sunn0))) has frequencies as low as 4Hz :shock:


They've done an experiment with 'brown noise' (or Brown, with a capital B, named after the discoveror? Oh, the irony!) but the results weren't very clear.

#135553 by Vinsfeld
Sun Dec 10, 2006 7:16 pm
Actually, The first time I got hummer and listened to it, It made my ears bleed!

To no fault of the album I don't doubt though! I had a zit in my ear and it popped after I was about 10 minutes into Arc. I took my headphones off for a second and felt blood coming out and FREAKED LIKE HELL! hahahaha.
Though I enjoy the CD, I haven't quite listened to it like I should yet. I'll try it when I go to bed tonight. :P

#135558 by Blodskur
Sun Dec 10, 2006 7:53 pm
Warning: Keep album away from acne prone people.

Or they'll explode.

#135739 by the fluke
Wed Dec 13, 2006 3:01 am
i find all this infrasonic stuff really interesting.

so maybe somebody can answer this question for me. what is the lowest frequency that can be stored / replicated on compact disc.

i would have thought that there is some limit, say 20Hz (like our ears). it wouldn't seem feasible or even that smart to create a medium that could contain frequencies lower that what our ears will allow. it would simply take up too much room that could be dedicated to more useful audible sound.

also. when you say sun o))) has frequencies of 4Hz...what exactly do you mean. those frequencies are contained on the recording?? explain??

#135744 by Biert
Wed Dec 13, 2006 9:50 am
the fluke wrote:also. when you say sun o))) has frequencies of 4Hz...what exactly do you mean. those frequencies are contained on the recording?? explain??

I don't know, they can probably only use such frequencies live.

#135749 by gozu
Wed Dec 13, 2006 10:55 am
they narely do anything from their recods live

its more *VERY VERY VERY LOUD MASSIVELY DISTORTED CHORD*

wait a minute and a half

*VERY VERY VERY LOUD MASSIVELY DISTORTED but slightly different CHORD*

#135750 by danceswithchickens
Wed Dec 13, 2006 11:12 am
the fluke wrote:i find all this infrasonic stuff really interesting.

so maybe somebody can answer this question for me. what is the lowest frequency that can be stored / replicated on compact disc.

i would have thought that there is some limit, say 20Hz (like our ears). it wouldn't seem feasible or even that smart to create a medium that could contain frequencies lower that what our ears will allow. it would simply take up too much room that could be dedicated to more useful audible sound.

also. when you say sun o))) has frequencies of 4Hz...what exactly do you mean. those frequencies are contained on the recording?? explain??


I don't see why a compact disc would have a limit as to the frequencies it can contain. Example: I have a bass CD with test tones that begin at 5Hz. Just because you can't hear the tone, it doesn't mean that you can't experience the effects of it on your surrounding environment, namely, the air rushing past your ears at 5 times per second, or the panels in you car vibrating at 5 times per second.

I'm no expert on recording mediums, but how would it take up more room, anyway? You are essentially saying that complex music takes up more space than simple music; eg. Green Day would have smaller files than The Dillinger Escape Plan, even if their songs were exactly the same length. Is this true? I doubt it, but I could be wrong...

#135818 by the fluke
Wed Dec 13, 2006 11:49 pm
danceswithchickens wrote:Just because you can't hear the tone, it doesn't mean that you can't experience the effects of it on your surrounding environment, namely, the air rushing past your ears at 5 times per second, or the panels in you car vibrating at 5 times per second.


but you can't experience it if the gear you're using can't replicate it.

after a bit of quick research it seems digitial audio has a full audio band frequency response of 5 - 22,000 Hz.

now, if you look at most amplifiers, they'll commonly have a frequency response of 20Hz to 20kHz.

so it seems to come down to the frequency respones of the amplifier and speakers you're using as to weather or not those infrasonic frequencies can be processed and replicated.

maybe it came out wrong, but i wasn't really saying it has anything to with complexity. more frequency response. i'd just figured that since most common systems aren't capable of replicating frequencies lower that 20hz that it'd be a waste to create a medium capable of storing frequencies that can't be replicated. but like you, i'm no expert, so i'd love to hear from anyone with an expert opinion.......

#135830 by A-Daamage
Thu Dec 14, 2006 5:12 am
the fluke wrote:
danceswithchickens wrote:Just because you can't hear the tone, it doesn't mean that you can't experience the effects of it on your surrounding environment, namely, the air rushing past your ears at 5 times per second, or the panels in you car vibrating at 5 times per second.


but you can't experience it if the gear you're using can't replicate it.

after a bit of quick research it seems digitial audio has a full audio band frequency response of 5 - 22,000 Hz.

now, if you look at most amplifiers, they'll commonly have a frequency response of 20Hz to 20kHz.

so it seems to come down to the frequency respones of the amplifier and speakers you're using as to weather or not those infrasonic frequencies can be processed and replicated.

maybe it came out wrong, but i wasn't really saying it has anything to with complexity. more frequency response. i'd just figured that since most common systems aren't capable of replicating frequencies lower that 20hz that it'd be a waste to create a medium capable of storing frequencies that can't be replicated. but like you, i'm no expert, so i'd love to hear from anyone with an expert opinion.......


It pretty much would be a waste of time because

a) most humans can't hear below 20 Hz. Anything below that would simply be felt, and since these frequencies are generally inaudible, you actually run the risk of severe damage to your hearing since you have no reference of sound level.

b) most speakers have trouble reproducing 30 - 50 Hz, let alone anything below 20 Hz, usually due to the size of the drivers (speakers, basically). To accurately reproduce 20 - 30 Hz generally requires LF (low frequency) drivers of at least 15 - 18 in. diameters.

c) the majority of power (read: wattage) in audio is situated in the low end, therefore, the lower the frequency, the more wattage, and thus decreased headroom. Decreased headroom equals more chance for clipping as well as damage to your speakers as the drivers need to work harder to reproduce low frequencies than higher. This is why many EQ's for PA systems come equipped with high pass/low cut filters to decrease the power in the low end and increase headroom (this is generally a very good idea to implement since it allows you more room to increase levels to vocals and other instruments).

#135831 by A-Daamage
Thu Dec 14, 2006 5:16 am
Oh, and what frequencies can be used for recording depends entirely on what kind of equipment you are using. CD's can store any frequency since it's not audio that is recorded onto the disc, but binary information, which gets transferred and translated by your CD player.

#135845 by danceswithchickens
Thu Dec 14, 2006 11:00 am
I don't think that your ears can be damaged by sound that you can't hear. I would think that if you can't hear it, it means the little hairs in your ears aren't moving, and if they aren't moving, they probably won't break.

At a local car audio shop, there is a room called the Room of Doom. It is essentially a giant bandpass enclosure, with the doorway acting as the port. There is a wall of twelve 15-inch subwoofers within the room, and the whole room is tuned to 10Hz. You stand in the doorway while the shop owner plays an 11Hz test tone. The sound causes your shirt to flap, makes your hair move, vibrates your whole body. It can move heavy obects inside the store. But you don't even feel it in your ears...

#136003 by Kristopher
Sat Dec 16, 2006 5:13 am
My 2 cents follows
I'm no expert but I do know a little and kind of work in the field of audio.
the frequencies you "can" hear do damage to your ears if at too high a volume. The ones you cant hear move other parts of your body.... ever felt that flutter in your heart just randomly??? A shiver up your spine is said to be someone walking over your grave.... more likely it is the reaction a person has to a particular subsonic frequency.
We can "hear" 20hz-20khz, but these arent the only frequencies that affect us.
But a bass frequency is a large sine wave... some are so big that those little hairs in our ears cannot move to that degree so we cant hear it, as the hairs arent moving they wont be damaged.
Humans are majority water.... water moves in waves... so does sound. The right frequency at the right volume will move you, so has the "potential" to do damage, though unlikely... just not neccesarily to your ears.

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